24 North Carolina Counties With Property Tax Assessment Revaluations in 2021

NC property tax appeals 2021

Because assessment reductions achieved through a successful property tax appeal are not retroactive, knowing when your property is subject to revaluation is critical.  The only way to maximize potential savings from an appeal is to file that appeal during the relevant revaluation year. 

For property tax purposes, each county in North Carolina is required to revalue all real property within its borders at least once every eight years. Revaluations for North Carolina's 100 counties are staggered so that not all counties are revaluing during the same year. Some counties elect to revalue property more frequently than the 8-year mandate — most commonly every four years.

2021 is a big year for revaluations in North Carolina, with nearly a quarter of all counties revaluing. The following 24 North Carolina counties are scheduled to revalue effective January 1, 2021:

  • Alleghany
  • Buncombe
  • Caldwell
  • Caswell
  • Chatham
  • Cleveland
  • Columbus
  • Currituck
  • Davidson
  • Davie
  • Forsyth
  • Greene
  • Haywood
  • Jackson
  • New Hanover
  • Orange
  • Person
  • Polk
  • Stanly
  • Stokes
  • Surry
  • Swain
  • Transylvania
  • Union

If you're responsible for property tax assessments of real property in any of these 24 counties, be on the lookout for revaluation notices, which should be mailed to the owner of record. While these notices could go out as early as December 2020, they're generally sent out in February or March of 2021.  Overlooking a revaluation notice is the first of many potential pitfalls that businesses face. Once the notice is sent out, the company has a specific period of time, as stated on the notice, to appeal informally to the tax assessor's office.

If you recieve your revalaution notice and believe it substantially overstates the value of your property effective January 1, 2021, give us a call to discuss whether an appeal might make good financial sense.

About the Author

Justin Hardy

Justin M. Hardy

Justin focuses his practice on property tax appeals, intellectual property law, tax controversy law, and general business law.  He is a regular contributor to both The North Carolina Property Tax Law Monitor and The Trademarketing Blog.  You can follow him on Twitter @JustinHardyBDP.
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