What to do about Forsyth County's 2017 "Value Pending" Property Tax Notices

Many owners of commercial properties in Forsyth are recieving revaluation notices that do not state a value at all. Instead, where the new 2017 value should be, the notices say "VALUE PENDING." Meanwhile, the deadline in Forsyth County for appealing 2017 property values to the Board of Equalization and Review is June 30, 2017.  These two facts beg the question:  What are you supposed to do if you've recieved a notice that doesn't tell you what the 2017 property value is going to be?

We reached out to the Forsyth County tax office and learned that it still does not have a set date for when it will notify owners of the new values of properties previously given a "VALUE PENDING" notice.  Instead, the office is working through these properties and mailing them out as they are completed.  

Once recieved, the taxpayer will have 15 days from the date on the notice to request an informal appeal, and (as always) can elect to pursue an appeal to the Board of Equalization and Review at any time before June 30. If the tax office does not mail a notice with a value within 15 days of the June 30 deadline, the taxpayer will still have 15 days to appeal, even if that 15 days runs after June 30.

So, if you are in this situation, you have two options:  

  • One option is to go ahead and appeal your VALUE PENDING notice, either with an informal appeal or a formal appeal to the Board of Equalization and Review.  Doing so should protect your right to appeal should you ultimately disagree with the value listed on your future notice.  
  • Another option is to wait and see what your future notice says, and then make a decision about whether to appeal. If you chose that route, understand that you don't have a large window to make that decision, so be sure to watch the mail closely.

If you disagree with your revaluation and are interested in pursuing an appeal, you can find out more about this process in our 2017 Guide to 2017 North Carolina Commercial Property Tax Revaluation

About the Author

Justin Hardy

Justin M. Hardy

Justin focuses his practice on property tax appeals, intellectual property law, tax controversy law, and general business law.  He is a regular contributor to both The North Carolina Property Tax Law Monitor and The Trademarketing Blog.  You can follow him on Twitter @JustinHardyBDP.
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